How to create your own palette using paint

Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paintColour palettes are useful little things when designing, especially interior design. Colour palettes are a selection of colours kept on a board or paper as a reference, ready mixed for specific project/artwork. It helps you to keep focus on the selection of the colours that create concept consistency through the design/painting process. There are many ways you can create a colour palette. You can use different material swatches or magazine cutouts to create 3D colour palette. Computer generated swatches are quite useful too and easy to create. However today we are talking how to make a colour palette by mixing your own paint. This technique is especially useful when you need to use some colours to create wall artwork or want a specific paint colour when painting the walls or furniture (of course these swatches can be successfully scanned at the paint shop for a larger quantity paint).Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paintRecently I visited the Lithuanian seaside that I get constantly inspired by. I blogged about it  many times across different seasons. This time I visited when there was still a little snow left! I used the photos I took as my inspiration.Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paintSo how do I create a colour palette using paint? First step is of course to choose the paint. Any type of paint can be used for this purpose, but acrylic is probably the easiest to handle. I used a mix of acrylic paint and also some kids washable water based paint because I did not have a good selection of acrylics. It is important that you have the primary colours (yellow, green, blue and red), plus black and white. The rest of the colours can be mixed.  Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paintTo create the colour palette you really need to have a good understanding of a colour wheel. When you understand how to achieve secondary and intermediate colours from primary colours you unlock so many other colours. Once those colours are unlocked they can be further developed by adding adding white or black to lighten or darken them. Just remember that black and white also dull the colours as well. Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint But first, before you begin creating the palette, you need to find an inspiration. You can either use photos like I did or pick an object (like a rug or patterned fabric) that has a colour combination you like. Mixing colours take practice, but it’s so fun when you get the right shade! Once I achieve the right shade I simply transfer them onto a clean piece of paper and let it dry. I particularly enjoy naming those colours, claiming ownership over them.Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paint Baltic sea colour palette, how to create palette using paintHope you found this inspiring!
Rasa xoxo

Au naturel Easter Eggs

Au naturel Easter eggs

I don’t often share my errors, but today I thought I will. I admit it happens too often when the craft project I am working on does not turn out how I would like to. Sometimes it’s about forgiving yourself and learning how to use those errors to your advantage.

This year I have decided to go all natural when dying my Easter eggs. I suppose to have loads of experiences with this  as Lithuanian Easter traditions are all about dying eggs (we don’t eat that many chocolate eggs). So I decided to go with batic technique. I applied molten bees wax on the areas that I wanted to stay un-dyed. This was really tricky as I used paint brushes (when I was little we used to use cotton buds, so I thought the application would be smoother with the brush. Oh I have been so wrong!). I chose duck eggs as I could not find white shelled chicken eggs in the shop. I boiled the eggs with coffee grinds for 10 min to get the brown colour (I somehow feel that the onion shell gives better colour from my previous experiences).

Au naturel Eater eggs

So here we go, the results were horrific in my opinion. The dyes did not stick well at all and completely ignored the wax I applied. The wax just melted off :-(. When I removed the eggs from the pot I could easily rub the colours off. So I tried to do it nicely and still make them pretty… no luck :-(.

Au naturel Easter eggs

Let’s put this way. We had dyed amazing Easter eggs in the past using this technique. And although I did everything exactly as before here is what I would do to make it better next time I get to dye Easter eggs again:

  • I would try to use pin heads instead of paint brushes to apply molten wax
  • I would not boil the eggs in the dyes
  • Therefore would use food colouring instead

Maybe you have better suggestions? Please let us know ;-).

Au naturel Easter eggs

Happy Easter everyone!

Rasa 🙂